Homeless Liaison

Statutory Language and Summary, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA, 2015)

Statutory Language and Summary on Homelessness and Foster Care in
“The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015”

This document provides the statutory language of the major amendments on homelessness and foster care in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). ESSA strengthens and improves the education of over 1.3 million children and youth experiencing homelessness, from early childhood through high school graduation, as well as establishing protections for students in foster care through a statutory vehicle that is separate from the McKinney-Vento Act.

FAFSA Application and Verification Guide (AVG)

The AVG provides information to college financial aid administrators and counselors who help students with the process of seeking federal student aid for post-secondary education. Unaccompanied homeless youth (UHY) are considered independent students for purposes of applying for federal student aid. This means that UHY do not need to include a parent signature or information… Read more »

Students Living with Caregivers: Tips for Local Liaisons and School Personnel

Each year, thousands of students stay with someone who serves as a caregiver, instead of living with a parent or legal guardian. The caregiver may be a relative, friend, school employee, or other individual. Some caregivers provide little to no support for youth staying with them, while others, especially with younger children, often assume more responsibility – even obtaining legal guardianship in some cases.

Dispute Resolution (McKinney-Vento Law)

Subtitle VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. § 11431 et seq.; hereafter the McKinney-Vento Act), reauthorized in 2015 by Title IX, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act, guarantees educational rights and supports for students experiencing homelessness. The Act requires State educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs; commonly referred… Read more »

Campus Self-Assessment Guide for the Education of Students in Highly Mobile and Homeless Situations

This guide was developed with the philosophy that schools can make a difference. Schools can provide a stabilizing environment, a haven from the chaos of homelessness. Schools can provide the quality of educational experience to empower students in homeless situations to break the cycles of poverty, dependency, and homelessness. Schools can provide a critical link between the community and children without homes and their families.  Children and youth in homeless situations are indeed educable and very capable of positively contributing to the betterment of our society. This guide helps schools answer the questions: What can we do to help children and youth in highly mobile and homeless situations? How can we help children and youth without homes learn?