Administrator

Campus Self-Assessment Guide for the Education of Students in Highly Mobile and Homeless Situations

This guide was developed with the philosophy that schools can make a difference. Schools can provide a stabilizing environment, a haven from the chaos of homelessness. Schools can provide the quality of educational experience to empower students in homeless situations to break the cycles of poverty, dependency, and homelessness. Schools can provide a critical link between the community and children without homes and their families.  Children and youth in homeless situations are indeed educable and very capable of positively contributing to the betterment of our society. This guide helps schools answer the questions: What can we do to help children and youth in highly mobile and homeless situations? How can we help children and youth without homes learn?

Supporting School Reform by Leveraging Federal Funds, USDE July 2015 Letter

The enclosed document highlights specific advantages and flexibilities in schoolwide programs, identifies common misunderstandings about schoolwide programs that may persist in some LEAs and schools, and serves as a resource tool for SEAs, LEAs, and schools. I encourage you to use this document in conjunction with existing guidance, and to circulate this document to your LEAs and schools.

Who Is Homeless?

Subtitle VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. § 11431 et seq.; hereafter the McKinney-Vento Act), reauthorized in 2015 by Title IX, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), ensures educational rights and protections for children and youth experiencing homelessness. This brief explains the legislation and offers strategies for implementing it… Read more »

TEA Legal Annual Letter – Re: Attendance, Admission, Enrollment Records, and Tuition

TEA’s Chief Legal Counsel updates this letter every year and releases it just  prior to the start of the school year.  This “to the administrator addressed” letter summarizes important statutes relating to student attendance, public school admission, enrollment records, and tuition. Part I of the letter relates to compulsory attendance, Part II relates to attendance… Read more »

Retention Schedule for Records of Public School Districts

This schedule establishes mandatory minimum retention periods for records that are associated with Public School Districts. No local government office may dispose of a record listed in this schedule prior to the expiration of its retention period. A records control schedule of a local government may not set a retention period that is less than that established for the record in this schedule. Original paper records may be disposed of prior to the expiration of their minimum retention periods if they have been microfilmed or electronically stored pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Code, Chapter 204 or Chapter 205, as applicable, and rules of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission adopted under those chapters. Actual disposal of such records by a local government is subject to the policies and procedures of its records management program.

What LEA Administrators Must Know

This brief outlines administrator responsibilities related to the homeless liaison duties.

Federal law requires every LEA (school district and charter school) to appoint a local homeless education liaison. Local liaisons are LEA staff members responsible for ensuring the identification, school enrollment, attendance, and opportunities for academic success of students in homeless situations. Some of these activities may be accomplished by the local liaison himself or herself; others are accomplished by coordinating efforts with other staff people. By linking students and their families to school and community services, local liaisons play a critical role in stabilizing students and promoting academic achievement at the individual, school, and district level.

Title I and Homelessness

The purpose of Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA; 20 U.S.C. § 6301 et seq.) is to provide all children with a fair, equitable, and high-quality education, and to close educational achievement gaps. Title I, Part A is designed to meet the educational needs of low-achieving children in schools… Read more »