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Focus on Empathy, Not Punishment, Improves Discipline

http://www.educationnews.org/k-12-schools/study-focus-on-empathy-not-punishment-improves-discipline/ Suspending a child from school may be more harmful than helpful — when a child is sent home as a punishment for misbehaving at school, it results in lost opportunities to learn, damaged relationships, and has the potential of setting up the student for future failure. A different mindset, however, could improve student behavior and lessen the… Read more »

THE MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ON THE EDUCATION RIGHTS OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN HOMELESS SITUATIONS

This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations, based on the amendments made by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015, which takes effect on October 1, 2016. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes, regulations,… Read more »

Sample Forms Related to the Dispute Resolution Process under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (from TASB)

This document was developed by the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB), and contains forms and procedures for LEAs related to the dispute of student eligibility for services under the McKinney-Vento homeless education provisions. The document contains two forms: Exhibit A: Dispute of Eligibility, School Selection, or Enrollment Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act—3 pages… Read more »

Supporting the Success of Homeless Children and Youths (EHCY Fact Sheet)

Research and data, including surveys of homeless and formerly homeless youths, indicate that experiencing homelessness can have significant negative impacts on children academically, socially, and emotionally. The Education for Homeless Children and Youths (EHCY) program, authorized under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (McKinney-Vento Act), is designed to address the needs of homeless children and youths… Read more »

Students Living with Caregivers: Tips for Local Liaisons and School Personnel

Each year, thousands of students stay with someone who serves as a caregiver, instead of living with a parent or legal guardian. The caregiver may be a relative, friend, school employee, or other individual. Some caregivers provide little to no support for youth staying with them, while others, especially with younger children, often assume more responsibility – even obtaining legal guardianship in some cases.

TSDS PEIMS Unaccompanied Youth Status Indicator Instructions

These instructions, developed by the Texas Homeless Education Office (THEO), are intended to assist districts in collecting and reporting information necessary for both PEIMS reporting and compliance with the McKinney-Vento Act regarding homeless, unaccompanied youth. This document itself is not a form or instrument that can be used to collect this information. However, it does… Read more »